Unified Modeling Language

Unified Modeling Language

You are not yet enrolled in this course.


Course Description

This course guide You into the Unified Modeling Language (UML) which lets You model processes and system design.
This course has  91 video lesson each is between 2-7 minutes + 3 BONUS lesson.

Certificate:
  PDF

Price:
Free

Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a general-purpose, developmental, modeling language in the field of software engineering, that is intended to provide a standard way to visualize the design of a system.

UML was originally motivated by the desire to standardize the disparate notational systems and approaches to software design developed by Grady Booch, Ivar Jacobson and James Rumbaugh at Rational Software in 1994–1995, with further development led by them through 1996.[

In 1997 UML was adopted as a standard by the Object Management Group (OMG), and has been managed by this organization ever since. In 2005 UML was also published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as an approved ISO standard.[2] Since then it has been periodically revised to cover the latest revision of UML.

Course Content

Lessons Status
1

1.1 Introduction to UML

2

1.2 Object Orientation 1 - Objects & Classes

3

1.3 Object Orientation 2 - Relationships

4

1.4 Object Orientation 3 - Polymorphism

5

10.1 Objects, Lifelines & Messages

6

10.10 Sequence Diagrams & Use Cases

7

10.2 Kinds of Messages

8

10.3 Create & Destroy Messages

9

10.4 Boundary, Entity & Control Elements

10

10.5 Interaction Frames

11

10.6 Fragments - Options

12

10.7 Fragments - Alternatives

13

10.8 Fragments - Loops

14

10.9 Fragments - Parallels

15

11.1 Objects, Links, & Messages

16

11.2 Nested Messages

17

11.3 Self -Messages

18

11.4 Conditional Messages

19

11.5 Looping Messages

20

11.6 Parallel Messages

21

11.7 Sequence vs Communication Diagrams

22

12.1 Introducing Components

23

12.2 Components & Interfaces

24

12.3 Realizations & Dependencies

25

12.4 Component Compartments

26

12.5 Black Box & White Box Views

27

12.6 Ports & Delegation Connectors

28

12.7 Component Stereotypes

29

13.1 What a Deployment Diagram Shows

30

13.2 Nodes

31

13.3 Artifacts

32

13.4 Manifestation

33

13.5 Communication Paths

34

2.1 The 4+1 Model

35

2.2 Static & Dynamic Approaches

36

2.3 Use Case & Class Diagrams

37

2.4 Object & Package Diagrams

38

2.5 State & Activity Diagrams

39

2.6 Sequence & Communications Diagrams

40

2.7 Component & Deployment Diagrams

41

3.1 Use Case Basics

42

3.2 Modeling Use Case Elements

43

3.3 A Use Case Diagram for an ATM

44

3.4 The ''include'' Dependency

45

3.5 The ''extend'' Dependency

46

3.6 Generalization

47

3.7 Putting It All Together

48

4.1 Classifiers Classes & Objects

49

4.10 Constraints & Notes

50

4.11 Finding Classes

51

4.2 Attributes & Operations

52

4.3 Stereotypes

53

4.4 Associations & Multiplicity

54

4.5 Association Classes

55

4.6 Aggregation & Composition

56

4.7 Generalization

57

4.8 Realization

58

4.9 Dependency

59

5.1 Abstract Classes & Operations

60

5.2 Interfaces

61

5.3 Collaborations

62

5.4 Templates

63

6.1 Objects-Instances

64

6.2 Connecting Objects

65

6.3 From Class Diagram to Object Diagram

66

7.1 Packages

67

7.2 Visibility

68

7.3 Relationships Among Packages

69

7.4 Accessing & Importing Packages

70

7.5 Merging Packages

71

7.6 Use Case Packages

72

7.7 When to Use Package Diagrams

73

8.1 States & Transitions

74

8.2 State Acivities

75

8.3 Pseudostates Initial & Terminate

76

8.4 Pseudostates Junction & Choice

77

8.5 Composite States

78

8.6 Pseudostates Fork & Join

79

8.7 Pseudostates Entry & Exit Points

80

8.8 Pseudostates Deep & Shallow History

81

8.9 Protocol State Machines

82

9.1 Activity Diagrams Basic Symbols

83

9.10 Using Swim Lanes

84

9.2 Alternative & Parallel Paths

85

9.3 Object Nodes

86

9.4 Pins

87

9.5 Subactivity Diagrams

88

9.6 Signals

89

9.7 Handling Exceptions

90

9.8 Interruptible Activity Regions

91

9.9 Expansion Regions

92

BONUS Cause and Effect Diagram Training Video (aka Fishbone Diagram & Ishikawa Diagram)

93

BONUS Introduction to UML

94

BONUS Use-case levels, essential UML Tutorial - Modeling the Real World

Leave a Comment